What I’m reading

Current

Alice Munro. Runaway. 25 June 2017 –

 

Archive

James Gleick. The Information. London: Fourth Estate, 2011. 11 May – 25 June 2017.

Murray Smith. Film, Art, and the Third Culture: A Naturalized Aesthetics of Film. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. 19 – 23 June 2017.

Phil Race. The Lecturer’s Toolkit: A practical guide to assessment, learning and teaching. 4th edition. London: Routledge, 2015. 9 – 13 June 2017.

Prof Steve Peters. The Chimp Paradox. London: Vermilion, 2012. 2 -3 June 2017.

Steve Silberman. Neurotribes: The Legacy of Autism and How to Think Smarter About People Who Think Differently. London: Allen & Unwin, 2015. 2 – 10 May 2017. (Read to page 254 then skipped to the final main chapter: ‘Building the Enterprise: Designs for a Neurodiverse World.’

John Yorke. Into the Woods: How Stories Work and Why We Tell Them. London: Penguin, 2013. 29 April – 2 May 2017.

Ferdinand Oyono. Houseboy. Trans. John Reed. Harlow: Heinemann, 1990. (French-language original first published 1960.) 30 April 2017.

Richard Feynman. Six Easy Pieces: The Fundamentals of Physics Explained. London: Penguin, 1998. 26 – 29 April. (Set aside at page 40.)

Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett. The Spirit Level: Why Equality is Better for Everyone. London: Penguin, 2010. 22 – 26 April 2017.

Yuval Noah Harari. Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow. London: Harvill Secker, 2016. 15 – 22 April 2017.

Yuval Noah Harari. Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind. London: Vintage, 2014. 10 – 15 April 2017.

Herman Hesse. The Glass Bead Game. Trans. Richard and Clara Winston. London: Vintage, 2000. (German-language original first published 1943.) 2 March – 10 April 2017.

Daniel Dennett. Intuition Pumps and Other Tools for Thinking. 27 December 2016 – 27 February 2017.

Tony Judt. Ill Fares the Land. London: Penguin, 2010. 31 January – 18 February 2017.

John Dewey. Art as Experience. New York: Perigree, 2005. 30 October 2016 – 22 January 2017.

Patricia Highsmith. Plotting and Writing Suspense Fiction. London: Sphere, 2016. 10 December 2016 – 21 January 2017.

Patrick Ness. The Knife of Never Letting Go. London: Walker, 2008. 14 – 16 January 2016.

Patricia Highsmith. The Talented Mr Ripley. London: Vintage, 1999. 4 – 10 January 2017.

Anthony Minghella. ‘Whale Music’. In his Plays: One. London: Methuen Drama, 1992. 2 December 2016.

Posy Simmonds. Tamara Drewe. London: Jonathan Cape, 2007. 20 – 24 November 2016.

Art Spiegelman. The Complete Maus. London: Penguin Books, 2003. 8 – 9 November 2016.

Graeme Macrae Burnet. His Bloody Project. Glasgow: Saraband, 2015. 19 – 27 October 2016.

Scott McCloud. Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art. New York: HarperCollins, 1993. 20 October 2016.

Edward O Wilson. Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge. New York: Vintage Books, 1998. 27 September – 18 October 2016. (Set aside at page 259.)

Patrick Colm Hogan. What Literature Teaches Us about Emotion. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. 17 October 2016. (Just the introduction and first two chapters.)

Jonathan Culpeper. Language and Characterisation: People in Plays and Other Texts. Harlow: Pearson, 2001. 14 – 17 October 2016. (Set aside at page 199.)

Patrick Colm Hogan. Cognitive Science, Literature, and the Arts: A Guide for Humanists. London: Routledge, 2003. 12 – 13 October 2016.

Peter Stockwell. Cognitive Poetics: An Introduction. London: Routledge, 2002. 10 – 11 October 2016.

Daniel L Schacter. The Seven Sins of Memory: How the Mind Forgets and Remembers. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2001. 29 September – 11 October 2016. (Set aside at page 48.)

Daniel C Dennett. Darwin’s Dangerous Idea: Evolution and the Meanings of Life. London: Penguin, 1996. 9 September – 11 October 2016. (Set aside at page 200.)

Lisa Zunshine. Getting Inside Your Head: What Cognitive Science Can Tell Us About Popular Culture. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012. 6-7 October 2016.

Serenity: Better Days. Story: Joss Whedon and Brett Matthews. Art: Will Conrad. Colors: Michelle Madsen. Letters: Michael Heisler. Milwaukie: Dark Horse Comics, 2008. 29 September 2016.

Stanislas Dehaene. Reading in the Brain: The New Science of How We Read. London: Penguin, 2009. 22 – 26 September 2016.

Neal Stephenson. Snow Crash. London: Penguin, 1993. 27 August – 24 September 2016.

Anthony J Sanford and Catherine Emmott. Mind, Brain and Narrative. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. 19 – 21 September 2016.

Michael Burke. Literary Reading, Cognition and Emotion: An Exploration of the Oceanic Mind. London: Routledge, 2011. 15 – 19 September 2016.

Martin Skov and Oshin Vartanian. eds. Neuroaesthetics. Amityville, NY: Baywood, 2009. 13 – 15 September 2016.

Suzanne Keen. Empathy and the Novel. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. 9 September 2016. (Set aside at page 50; I will jump in later reading to relevant passages.)

Brian Boyd. On the Origin of Stories: Evolution, Cognition, and Fiction. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009. 6- 8 September 2016.

Amy Pascale. Joss Whedon: Geek King of the Universe. A Biography. London: Aurum, 2014. 29 August – 7 September 2016.

Brian Boyd, Joseph Carroll and Jonathan Gottschall. eds. Evolution, Literature, and Film: A Reader. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010. 26 August – 6 September 2016.

Joseph Carroll. Reading Human Nature: Literary Darwinism in Theory and Practice.  Albany, NY: SUNY Press: 2011. 25-26 August 2016. (Just Part One and Chapters 11 and 12, for now.)

Denis Dutton. The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. 23 – 24 August 2016.

Steven Pinker. The Stuff of Thought: Language as a window into Human Nature. London: Penguin, 2007. 8 – 22 August 2016.

Chris Rojek. Presumed Intimacy: Para-Social Relationships in Media, Society and Celebrity Culture. Cambridge: Polity, 2016. 15 – 17 August 2016.

David Foster Wallace. A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again. London: Abacus, 1998. 27 July – 13 August 2016.

Rhonda Wilcox. Why Buffy Matters: The Art of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. London: I B Tauris, 2005. 27-28 July 2016.

Louisa Hall. Speak. London: Orbit, 2015. 27 June – 26 July 2016.

Deborah Thomas. Reading Buffy. One of three monographs in Close-Up 01, edited by John Gibbs and Douglas Pye. London: Wallflower, 2006. 22 – 23 July 2016.

Eric Hobsbawm. On History. London: Abacus, 1998. 27 April – 16 July 2016.

J K Rowling. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. London: Bloomsbury, 1999. 18 March 2016 – 22 June 2016. [This languished  on my book pile for ages after about two or three chapters had been read, and then I read the rest in about 48 hours!]

Graeme Turner. What’s Become of Cultural Studies? London: Sage, 2012. 14 – 18 June 2016.

Ha-Joon Chang. 23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism. London: Penguin, 2011. 3 – 14 June 2016.

John Dewey. Democracy and Education. Kindle edition (Start Publishing, 2012). (Originally published 1916.) 12 March – 8 June 2016.

Gary Shteyngart. Super Sad True Love Story. London: Granta, 2010. 12 – 26 May 2016.

James Crumley. The Last Good Kiss. London: Black Swan, 2016. (Originally published 1978.) 24 April – 11 May 2016.

David Hendy. Public Service Broadcasting. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. 4 – 5 May 2016.

C. Claire Thomson. Thomas Vinterberg’s Festen (The Celebration). Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2013. 28 April – 2 May 2016.

J. G. Ballard. High-Rise. Kindle edition (Fourth Estate, 2012). (Originally published 1975.) 30 April – 1 May 2016.

Ha-Joon Chang. Economics: The User’s Guide. London: Penguin, 2014. 3 – 24 April 2016.

Sergei Lukyanenko. The Night Watch. Trans. Andrew Bromfield. London: William Heinemann, 2006. (Originally published in Russian 1998.) 21 March – 3 April 2016.

Dudley Andrew. André Bazin. Revised Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. 23 January – 19 March 2016.

J K Rowling. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. London: Bloomsbury, 1998. 28 January – 11 March 2016.

S C Gordon. Bicycle Thieves. London: British Film Institute, 2008. (Published by Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke.) 27 – 29 February 2016.

Adam Mars-Jones. Noriko Smiling. London: Notting Hill Editions, 2011. 21 – 22 February 2016.

Stephen King. The Stand: The Complete and Uncut Edition. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1990. 18 October 2015 – 14 February 2016.

French Stories/Contes Français: A Dual-Language Book. ed and trans. Wallace Fowlie. New York: Dover, 1990. 1 September 2015 – 13 February 2016. (Set aside after first story – Voltaire’s ‘Micromegas’.)

Graham Roberts. The Man with the Movie Camera. London: I B Tauris, 2000. 28 January – 1 February 2016.

J K Rowling. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. London: Bloomsbury, 1997. 29 December 2015 – 26 January 2016.

Matthew M Hurley, Daniel C Dennett and Reginald B Adams, Jr. Inside Jokes: Using Humor to Reverse-Engineer the Mind. London: The MIT Press, 2011. 22 October 2015 – 23 January 2016. (Set aside at page 60.)

Greg Sestero and Tom Bissell. The Disaster Artist: My Life Inside The Room, The Greatest Bad Movie Ever Made. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2013. 4 – 18 January 2016.

J Douglas Rabb and J Michael Richardson. Joss Whedon as Shakespearean Moralist: Narrative Ethics and the Buffyverse. Jefferson: McFarland, 2015. 26 December 2015 – 2 January 2016.

Steven D Levitt and Stephen J Dubner. Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything. London: Penguin Books, 2006. 14 November – 23 December 2015. (Not the bonus material.)

V F Perkins. The Magnificent Ambersons. London: BFI Publishing, 1999. 21 November 2015.

Jon Ronson. So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed. London: Picador, 2015. 7 – 13 November 2015.

Maryanne Wolf. Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain. Cambridge: Icon Books, 2008. 9 – 18 October 2015.

Steven Pinker. The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature. London: BCA, 2002. 21 September – 8 October 2015.

Steven Pinker. The Language Instinct: The New Science of Language and Mind. London: Penguin, 1995. 29 August – 21 September 2015.

Douglas R Hofstadter. Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden BraidHarmondsworth: Penguin, 1980. 11 June – 28 August 2015.

Emily St. John Mandel. Station ElevenLondon: Picador, 2014. 16 – 24 August 2015.

Thomas Elsaesser and Malte Hagener. Film Theory: An Introduction Through the SensesAbingdon: Routledge, 2010. 6 – 17July 2015. (Set aside at page 81.)

Steven Pinker. How the Mind Works. London: Penguin, 1999. 31 May – 17 July 2015.

Richard Powers. Galatea 2.2. London: Abacus, 1996. 27 May – 30 June 2015.

Steven Pinker. The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century. London: Allen Lane, 2014. 21 – 25 June 2015.

Jason Mittell. Complex TV: The Poetics of Contemporary Television StorytellingLondon: New York University Press, 2015. 19 – 25 June 2015.

Robert H Frank. The Economic Naturalist: Why Economics Explains Almost EverythingLondon: Virgin Books, 2008. 27 – 30 May 2015.

Zia Haider Rahman. In the Light of What We KnowLondon: Picador, 2014. 17 – 25 May 2015.

Jeffrey Steingarten. The Man Who Ate Everything. London: Headline, 2006. 16 May 2015. (Abandoned at page 82.)

James Curran and Jean Seaton. Power Without Responsibility: Press, broadcasting and the internet in Britain. 7th edition. Routledge, 2010. 10 January – 16 May 2015.

Wallace Stegner. Crossing to Safety. London: Penguin, 2006. (Novel originally published 1987.) 8 – 19 April 2015.

Rediscover Grammar with David Crystal. Harlow: Longman, 1988. 2 February – 16 April 2015.

John Williams. Stoner. London: Vintage, 2012. (Novel originally published 1965.) 1 – 8 April 2015.

Joseph Campbell. The Hero with a Thousand Faces. 2nd edition. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1968. (1st edition published 1949.) 11 January – 21 March 2015. (Abandoned at page 68, after also reading the epilogue.)

Stephen King. CarrieOriginally published 1974. In Stephen King. The Shining/Carrie/Misery. London: Chancellor Press, 1992, pp. 319-437. 1 – 7 March 2015.

Jean Shepherd. A Christmas Story. Broadway Books, 2003. 12 – 16 January 2015.

Rebecca Newberger Goldstein. Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won’t Go Away. Atlantic Books, 2014. 25 December 2014 – 4 January 2015.

One thought on “What I’m reading

  1. Pingback: The ongoing quest to spend my time wisely | Between Sympathy and Detachment

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